Tag Archives: benefit

Dennis Bielik

Attract Employees by Offering a 401(k) Plan

By Dennis Bielik
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Dennis Bielik

Even for the soaring cannabis industry, recruitment and retention of a qualified workforce remains a significant challenge in 2022. Although a tight labor market was not a new situation for many industries, the COVID-19 pandemic made it much worse and widespread, and the pain has yet to subside. In 2021, 47 million workers voluntarily left their jobs and nearly half of small businesses are experiencing worker shortages.

About 43% of workers who quit their jobs cited inadequate benefits as a factor in their decision. Among workers who cited benefits as a top concern, more than three-quarters said retirement plans are a “must-have” benefit. Most small businesses in the U.S. (74%) of 50 employees or fewer, however, do not check that box on a potential hire’s requirements list.

Offering a 401(k) plan, therefore, can help any company attract and retain workers. Even companies in emerging fields like cannabis can add 401(k) retirement savings plans to the roster of benefits for its employees.

In addition, there are tax benefits for the company should it offer a 401(k) plan and also match employee contributions. Employer contributions are deductible on the employer’s federal income tax return, so long as those contributions stay below the limitations described in section 404 of the Internal Revenue Service’s Internal Revenue Code.

Given the complexity of the cannabis industry and its hazy legal status in the U.S., however, it can be more challenging for cannabis companies to find benefits providers willing to create a program. Finding the right partners to navigate the process will help cannabis companies provide this significant employee benefit package.

Cannabis organizations have run into similar roadblocks finding banks and payroll providers willing to partner with them, and some large financial firms that offer retirement plans often decline to work with cannabis companies as well. But a growing number of boutique firms offer 401(k) programs and other benefits for this industry — it just requires the right partners to find the right plan.

Four tips for creating a 401(k) for cannabis workers

These four tips can help cannabis companies offer a 401(k):

  • Plan Structure and Objectives: Outline the goals of the 401(k) plan and how it will be set up, including how employees will be rewarded for participation. Consider developing a formal investment policy statement that includes monitoring the plan.
  • Matching Contributions and Auto-enrollment: Offering to match employee contributions tends to increase participation in retirement plans and increase employee satisfaction. There are a wide variety of paths the company could follow, but a good example would have the company matching 50% of salary up to 6%. Regarding automatic enrollment of employees into the plan, such a policy has shown to increase both participation and engagement.
  • 401(k) 101: The company may need to educate its employees on the basics of a 401(k) plan if one was not offered previously. Employees may be unfamiliar with how these plans work and how to optimize their investment choices. Cannabis companies need to offer clear information on the benefits of the program, including information on managing their portfolio. This approach will make workers feel more comfortable with their investments and encourage engagement.
  • Partner with 401(k) Experts: Emerging industries like cannabis can be complex. Cannabis companies that want to implement a 401(k) should partner with consultants who understand the intricacies of the sector and know what retirement benefits companies cater to the industry.
Rob Adelson
Soapbox

Collaborative Health Model to Advance Cannabis Research

By Rob Adelson
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Rob Adelson

The projected growth of the legal cannabis market is astounding. According to a report from BDS Analytics, the industry is expected to grow from $9.2B to $47.3B in 2027 in North America, with medical cannabis contributing 33% of that overall growth. While this number is impressive for an industry still in its infancy, I have reason to believe it can be much higher.

In the pharmaceutical industry, treatment of pain and insomnia represent an annual revenue exceeding $140B; concurrently, studies have shown cannabis to be an effective treatment for both conditions. If medical cannabis can capture 10% of that revenue over the next ten years, it essentially doubles the current estimates mentioned above.

So, what stands in our way? Education.

To gain acceptance from the medical community, physicians need to better understand the plant and its therapeutic benefits. To do so, they need more substantial data to prove cannabis’ efficacy before prescribing it to their patients. However, federal illegalities have prevented government-mandated clinical studies, but I believe there’s another way.

By adopting a collaborative health care model, patients and caregivers can work together to track the effectiveness of their cannabis treatments and share their learnings with the larger medical community.  With the right tools in place, we can fast-track the research process and provide physicians and politicians with the information they need to make this medicine more approachable and accessible to those who could benefit from it.

By harnessing the power of the community, we can apply learnings from one patient’s cannabis use to help countless others.The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) was a five-year study consisting of approximately 2500 patients with back and spine conditions. Participants entered qualitative data into an online portal, including post-surgical results and patient outcomes, to provide a comprehensive insight into treatment methods and their efficacy. Today, others suffering with those same conditions can enter their personal information into an online calculator and receive a prospective treatment plan. Together, patients and their doctors can view results and build a customized plan using more informed decisions about the available treatment options.

Another example comes from OpenNotes– an exploratory study that provides patients with full access to their medical files and the opportunity to input comments about their doctor visits and prognosis and make corrections related to the care they received. Results showed that this process helped patients retain a better understanding of their condition which improved their decision making and resulted in increased adherence to treatment plan protocols because they had greater trust with their doctors.Not only will this improve the patient experience by providing a safer, more sustainable treatment option, it also provides a very significant financial opportunity.

I believe the cannabis industry can take a leadership role in empowering patients to become active participants in their own treatment, while also sharing knowledge with the larger patient and physician communities. In fact, this core belief was the reason I founded Resolve Digital Health. Data-empowered patients not only make better decisions but also enjoy a greater feeling of control over their treatment. The power of collaborative healthcare grows exponentially when the data is shared to educate a broader group. By harnessing the power of the community, we can apply learnings from one patient’s cannabis use to help countless others.

Businesses within the cannabis industry can also leverage this data to create new products and services. For example, insights as to what products work best for certain conditions can help LP’s improve their product offerings and guide recommendations from dispensaries. Through product innovation, companies can make cannabis more accessible to a larger group of patients, who may be currently taking pharmaceuticals. Not only will this improve the patient experience by providing a safer, more sustainable treatment option, it also provides a very significant financial opportunity.

Ultimately, knowledge is power. When patients are empowered to make educated decisions about their health care and doctors are more tuned into the patient-tested cannabis treatment options, it’s a win-win for everyone.