Tag Archives: ISO 17025:2017

Moving Towards Greater Competency in Cannabis Testing

By Ravi Kanipayor
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While legalization of recreational cannabis remains in a fluid state in the United States, the medical application of cannabis is gaining popularity. As such, the  diversification of  pharmaceutical and edible cannabis products will inevitably lead to increased third party testing, in accordance with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mandates. Laboratories entering into cannabis testing, in addition to knowing the respective state mandates for testing procedures, should be aligned with Federal regulations in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

In 2010, the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA)1 established a cannabis committee with the primary objective of addressing issues related to the practices and safe use of legally-marketed cannabis and cannabis-related products. The committee issued a set of recommendations, outlining best practices for the cultivation, processing, testing and distribution of cannabis and cannabis products. The recommendations for laboratory operations sets some basic principles for those performing analysis of cannabis products. These principles, complementary to existing good laboratory practices and international standards, focus on the personnel, security, sample handling/disposal, data management and test reporting unique to laboratories analyzing cannabis samples.

As local and federal regulations continue to dictate medical and recreational cannabis use, many will venture into the business of laboratory testing to meet the demands of this industry. Thus, it is not surprising that cannabis producers, distributors and dispensaries will need competent testing facilities to provide reliable and accurate results. In addition, our understanding of cannabis from an analytical science perspective will derive from test reports received from these laboratories. Incorrect or falsified results can be costly to their business and can even lead to lawsuits when dealing with consumer products. Examples of fines and/or suspensions related to incorrect/false reporting of results have already gained coverage in news media. This sets up the need for the cannabis industry to establish standardized protocols for laboratory competency.

The international standard, ISO 17025 – ‘General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories’ – plays an important role in providing standard protocols to distinguish labs with proven quality, reliability and competency. The industry needs to rely not only on the initial accreditation received, but also on the ongoing assessment of the labs to ensure continuous competency.

Receiving accreditation involves an assessment by an International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC) recognized accrediting body, which ensures that laboratories have the competency, resources, personnel and have successfully implemented a sound quality management system that complies with the international standard ISO/IEC 17025:2017. This ISO standard is voluntary, but recognized and adopted globally by many industries for lab services. Cannabis companies can ensure that the test services they receive from accredited laboratories will meet the requirements of the industry, as well as the state and federal regulatory agencies. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is an independent, non-governmental organization with over 160 memberships of national standards bodies, and all with a unified focus on developing world-class standards for services, systems, products, testing to ensure quality, safety, efficiency and economic benefits.

ILAC is a non-profit organization made up of accreditation bodies (ABs) from various global economies. The member bodies that are signatories to the ILAC Mutual Recognition Arrangement (ILAC MRA) have been peer evaluated to demonstrate their competence. The ILAC MRA signatories, in turn, assess testing labs against the international standard, ISO/IEC 17025 and award accreditation. Accreditation is the independent evaluation of conformity assessment in accordance with the standard and related government regulations to ensure the lab carry out specific activities (called the ‘Scope’) impartially and competently. Through this process, cannabis industry stakeholders and end users can have confidence in the test results they receive from the labs.

Understanding the principles of accreditation and conformity to ISO standards is the beginning of the ISO 17025 accreditation process. Similar to other areas of testing, accreditation gives cannabis testing labs global recognition such that their practices meet the highest standards in providing continuous consistency, reliability and accuracy.

Many government agencies (state and federal) in the US and around the world are mandating cannabis testing laboratories to seek accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025:2017, in an effort to standardize their practice and provide the industry with needed assurance. Conformance with the standard enables labs to demonstrate their competency in generating reliable results, thereby providing assurance to those who hire their services.

Testing of cannabis can be very demanding and challenging given that state and federal regulations require that the performance and quality of the testing activities must provide consistent, reliable and accurate results. Hence, labs deciding to set up cannabis testing will have to take extra care in setting up a laboratory facility, acquiring all necessary and appropriate testing equipment, hiring qualified and experience staff and developing and implementing test methods to ensure the process, sample throughput, data integrity and generated output are continuously reliable, accurate and meet the need of the clients and requirements of the regulatory bodies. This demands the lab to establish and implement very sound quality assurance program, good laboratory practices and a quality management system (QMS).

Some expected challenges are:

  1. Standardization of test methods and protocols
    1. Since there is no federal guidance in standardization of test methods and protocols for cannabis testing in US, it is challenging for laboratories to research and validate other similar, established methods and gain approval from the local and state authorities.
  2. Facility
    1. Cannabis testing activities must be physically isolated from other testing activities for those labs conducting business in other areas of testing such as environment, food, mining, etc.
    2. Microbiological testing requires additional physical isolation within the testing facility, maintaining sterility of the environment, test area and test equipment.
  3. Equipment
    1. The test equipment such as Chromatographs (GC/LC), Spectrometers (ICP-MS, ICP-OES, UV-Vis), and other essential analytical instruments must meet the specifications required to detect and quantify and statistically justify the test parameters at the stipulated concentration levels. That means the limit of detection and limit of quantitation of each parameter must be well below the regulatory limits and the results are statistically sound.
    2. Calibration, maintenance and operation of analytical equipment must be appropriate to produce results traceable to international standards such as International System of Units and National Institute of Standards and Technology (SI and NIST).
  4. Staff
    1. The qualification and experience of the staff should ensure standard test methods are implemented and verified to meet the specifications.
    2. They should have a sound understanding of the QA/QC protocols and effective implementation of a quality management system which conforms to ISO/IEC 17025:2017 standard.
    3. Staff should be properly trained in all standard operating procedures (SOPs) and receiving schedule re-training as needed. Training should be accurately documented.
  5. QMS
    1. The QMS should not only meet the requirements of ISO 17025, but also be appropriate to the scope of the laboratory activities. Such a system must be planned, implemented, verified and continuously improved to ensure effectiveness.

Finally, stakeholders should seek expert advice in establishing a cannabis testing lab prior to initiating the accreditation. This can be achieved through a cyclic PLAN-DO-CHECK-ACT process. Labs that are properly established can attain the accreditation process in as little as 3-5 months. An initial ‘Gap Analysis’ can be extremely helpful in this matter.

IAS, an ILAC MRA signatory and international accrediting body based in California is one such organization that provides training programs for those interested in attaining accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025:2017. It is a nonprofit, public-benefit corporation that has been providing accreditation services since 1975. IAS accredits a wide range of companies and organizations including governmental entities, commercial businesses, and professional associations worldwide. IAS accreditation programs are based on recognized national and international standards that ensure domestic and/or global acceptance of its accreditations.2


References

  1. American Herbal Products Association , 8630 Fenton Street, Suite 918 , Silver Spring, MD 20910 , ahpa.org.
  2. International Accreditation Services, iasonline.org.

Green Leaf Laboratory Gets First ISO 17025:2017 Accreditation in Oregon

By Cannabis Industry Journal Staff
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The American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) published a press release yesterday announcing the accreditation of Green Leaf Laboratory, a cannabis testing lab based in Portland, Oregon. According to that press release, they are the first cannabis testing lab in the state of Oregon to achieve the ISO 17025:2017 accreditation.

Rowshan Reordan, founder of Green Leaf Laboratory, says they have been a leader in the cannabis market since for more than nine years, since their launch in 2011. “Receiving our ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation, in addition to required state accreditation, affirms our commitment to quality science and leadership in this industry,” says Reordan. “Working with A2LA and being recognized as the first A2LA accredited laboratory in Oregon has been a great experience. We appreciated the thoroughness in their accreditation process and their commitment to excellence. We look forward to a successful future with A2LA and continuing our commitment to leadership and excellence in the industry.”

“We congratulate Green Leaf Laboratories on becoming the first cannabis testing laboratory accredited to ISO/IEC 17025:2017 in the state of Oregon”, says Anna Williams, Accreditation Supervisor at A2LA. “A2LA is excited to see testing laboratories think outside of the box and elect to use our services in states not mandating them.”

A2LA Accredits First Labs in Tennessee and Oklahoma

By Cannabis Industry Journal Staff
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According to a press release published earlier this week, A2LA announced the accreditation of two separate cannabis laboratories in two separate states; both are the first cannabis testing labs accredited in their states. Demeter Laboratory, based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and Galbraith Laboratories, based in Knoxville, Tennessee, achieved the ISO 17025:2017 accreditation.

According to Cassy VanTassel, M.S., quality manager at Demeter Laboratory, Oklahoma is still developing and defining their regulatory framework for cannabis testing requirements. “Even though the State of Oklahoma is still establishing regulations and legislation, Demeter will always strive to meet the highest quality standards, so our customers know they are getting the best quality testing,” says VanTassel. “Demeter chose A2LA as its Accreditation Body due to their reputation in the industry, their diverse clientele, and the quality of their assessors.”

In Tennessee, Galbraith Labs is looking to aid the hemp industry in product safety testing. Christy Myers, customer service manager at Galbraith Laboratories, says they want to help farmers produce safe hemp products. “We are proud of our commitment to stay current within our industry and achieve the high standards set by A2LA,” says Myers. “Adding cannabis testing to our line of services was a great opportunity for Galbraith Laboratories to serve the community by helping farmers produce safe and legal hemp.”

Galbraith Labs was founded in 1950 as a contract lab in Knoxville serving many industries. With their newly established accreditation, they hope to aid the cannabis industry in Tennessee with hemp testing. Demeter Laboratory is the first medical cannabis lab in Oklahoma. Their goals include “advancing quality controls in medical cannabis, supporting safe consumption of cannabis and ensuring the transparency of the cannabis community.”

Stillwater Labs Accredited to ISO/IEC 17025

By Cannabis Industry Journal Staff
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The American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) announced earlier this month the accreditation of Stillwater Laboratories, Inc. to ISO/IEC 17025. Based in Olney, Montana, Stillwater Labs is the first laboratory A2LA has accredited to the ISO 17025 standard in the state. 

According to a press release, Stillwater is also the first in the state to go through a dual assessment, a new program put in place Fall of 2018. Both ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation and Americans for Safe Access (ASA) Patient Focused Certification were obtained by the lab. Stillwater achieved the recently updated ISO 17025:2017 accreditation.

“Stillwater Labs is honored to achieve ISO/IEC 17025:2017 accreditation” says Dr. Ron Brost, laboratory director Stillwater. “Quality methods are the cornerstone of our operations, and accreditation through the A2LA has been a valuable developmental process. We used the opportunity to refine, clarify, and tune our systems in order to bring world-class analytics to our clients in Montana. We look forward to continuing to drive advanced technologies coupled with excellent customer service through ISO/IEC 17025 best practices.” 

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EVIO Labs Florida Achieves ISO17025:2017 Accreditation

By Aaron G. Biros
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EVIO Labs Florida received their ISO 17025:2005 accreditation in February of 2018. Last week, EVIO Labs Florida announced via a press release that they completed their ISO 17025:2017 accreditation and received a certification from AOAC International. The accreditation helped them to further expand their testing scope to shelf life and stability testing, the ability to detect harmful bacteria and calculate degradation in samples.

The certification that they received from AOAC helps verify their ability to conduct accurate and fair 3rd party testing, meeting Florida’s requirements for the market. Back when the laboratory first started in 2017, there were no requirements for lab testing cannabis products under Florida’s regulations.

Chris Martinez
Chris Martinez, co-founder and president of EVIO Labs Florida

Upon expanding to their Gainesville location in November last year and getting accredited to ISO 17025:2017 last week, EVIO Labs Florida expects the new location to be compliant and operational by April 2019, in preparation for the state’s new regulations. “Our team has worked diligently to maintain our stance as the Gold Standard in Cannabis Testing,” says Chris Martinez, co-founder and president of EVIO Lab Florida. “The ability to obtain the recent ISO 17025:2017 and AOAC certification is a testament to our dedication in maintaining public safety and product integrity in an ever-growing industry.”

Martinez is also presenting during the 2ndAnnual Cannabis Labs Virtual Conference on April 2, where he will discuss how EVIO Labs Florida began as a laboratory and how they were able to expand to a second location and grow their market presence in Florida. Click here to register for his talk.

2nd Annual Cannabis Labs Virtual Conference Announced

By Cannabis Industry Journal Staff
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The 2ndAnnual Cannabis Labs Virtual Conference is set to take place on Tuesday, April 2, 2019, starting at 12:00 Noon and concluding at 4:00 PM EDT. This complimentary series of webinars will take a deep dive into a variety of subjects related to cannabis testing and the laboratory industry.

The virtual event will help attendees better understand some of the more technical aspects of starting and operating a laboratory. Topics discussed will include pesticide testing, cannabinoid and terpene testing, the new ISO 17025:2017 accreditation and a lesson in starting a laboratory in a new market.

Attendees registering for this complimentary series of webinars will get access to four veterans of the cannabis lab testing industry, who are available for Q&A after each presentation. In addition to getting the opportunity to chat with these subject matter experts on April 2, a recording of the presentations will be made available to all who register.

Charles Deibel, President & CEO – Deibel Labs, Inc.

Here is a snapshot of the agenda:

Pesticide Testing: Methods, Strategies & Sampling
Charles Deibel, President & CEO – Deibel Labs, Inc.

Pesticides represent the number one area for batch failures in the US cannabis market. These are concerns not only for consumers, but are a very big concern for cultivators and manufacturers of cannabis products. remediation of the pesticides, once they are in the product are not always feasible From the lab level, they are also the hardest test to run in the laboratory, even one equipped with state-of-the-art equipment. The best instruments on the market are very expensive and there are no standardized methods, meaning lab to lab variability has happened.

  • What are the pesticides in cannabis and are there any that are the “main concerns” or ones that stand out as particularly damaging?
  • What is a basic breakdown of the testing and methods used for pesticide testing?
  • What are the best strategies for the sampling of cannabis products?

    Chris Martinez
    Chris Martinez, Co-Founder & President, EVIO Labs FL

Building a Lab in an Emerging Market
Chris Martinez, Co-Founder & President, EVIO Labs FL

  • Will present a discussion of the genesis of EVIO Labs Florida, how to start a lab in a new market
  • Challenges in how we navigated changing regulations in a state with newly legalized cannabis
  • Expanding a lab to a second location – logistics, hiring, training, consistency.

Cannabinoid & Terpene Testing: Methods, Strategies & Standardization

Dr. Cindy Orser, Chief Science Officer, Digipath Labs

  • Appreciation of “measurement uncertainty” in cannabis testing

    Dr. Cindy Orser, Chief Science Officer, Digipath Labs
  • Standardization of testing methods is a high priority
  • Terpenes are the distinguishing chemicals in cannabis sensory perception and chemotaxonomy

Benefits of Accreditation to the ISO 17025:2017 Standard
Jane Weitzel, Independent Consultant

  • The ISO/IEC 17025:2017 standard is now being used to accredit cannabis testing laboratories. From this presentation you will learn the key new aspects of the standard. This includes risk-based thinking. Many aspects of this risk approach require the use of measurement uncertainty. This means the measurement uncertainty must be adequately evaluated. You will be introduced to evaluating and using measurement uncertainty.
  • The 2017 standard emphasizes conflict of interest and impartiality. Procedures and practices to achieve impartiality will be shown. This reduces the risk of potentially damaging leaks of information or the risk of people not working to the best interests of the laboratory and its clients.

    Jane Weitzel, Independent Consultant
  • The 2017 standard is a valuable and useful business tool that can save the laboratory resources, effort and money. Are you doing too much testing? Are you doing too little testing? When you evaluate the measurement uncertainty you can use it to learn the steps in your test method that need enhancement to reduce the risk of making mistakes. You can also use the measurement uncertainty to focus on the significant steps and stop wasting time on steps and activities that are insignificant.
  • These benefits of laboratory accreditation will be demonstrated with examples from the cannabis industry.

To learn more about this complimentary series of webinars, click here to look at the agenda and register.

Digipath Labs Now ISO 17025:2017 Accredited

By Aaron G. Biros
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According to a press release published in December, Digipath Labs, based in Las Vegas, Nevada, was recently accredited to the updated ISO standard, ISO 17025:2017. The laboratory received their accreditation from Perry Johnson Laboratory Accreditation (PJLA).

ISO 17025:2005 has long been the standard that labs seek accreditation to, but their newest 2017 edition was recently rolled out and introduced to the market. The new 2017 standard includes some broad changes to terminology, process approach, scope, and it importantly introduces the concept of risk-based thinking.

That concept of risk-based thinking is particularly relevant to the cannabis testing market, where many have argued for more transparency and uniformity in different state regulations and markets. Introducing risk-based thinking in the standard means that assessors also look at the risk of bias, impartiality and assessing measurement uncertainty, which certainly adds a layer of subjectivity to the accreditation.

PJLATracy Szerszen, president/operations manager of PJLA, says the newer standard also includes a provision for a quality management system review among other changes. “We are making sure they are following the standard from a technical standpoint, meaning they have the right equipment, the appropriate personnel and also have a quality management system,” says Szerszen. “November 29, 2020 is the deadline for moving to the new 2017 standard.”

According to Todd Denkin, CEO and founder of Digipath, obtaining the new ISO accreditation poises them for future growth and expansion. “Digipath Labs has now brought its standard of excellence in cannabis testing under the updated ISO-17025:2017 umbrella as we seek to expand our dominance in cannabis testing markets,” says Denkin. “This is a major step in positioning Digipath as a global leader in testing services.”